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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
let's bring in former ambassador mark ginsberg who knew ambassador stevens we know the intelligence community is very small, so we're sorry for your life. >> thank you. the fact of the matter is the foreign service and all of us who have served in the past in the diplomatic service and who knew chris from the time -- he was teaching english in morocco in the peace corp. when i was ambassador. he and i had been in contact because the national geographic society was signing a new agreement to do scientific exchange programs with the libyan government. he was really excited about that. and we had exchanged emails about how to begin facilitating the training of young libyans for the scientific exchange programs. he was someone who was everything that all of us ever hoped or aspired to be. either to work in the foreign service or be affiliated with one of the greatest groups of individuals that served this country abroad. >> ambassador, stay with us. we want to talk about that a little bit more. nbc chief white house correspondent chuck todd is in washington with us. chuck, a somber cere
east policy to president jimmy carter, mark ginsberg. thank you for joining us tonight. we've tapped into your wisdom individually many times in the past. let's begin sequentially and go through where things are beginning with libya. where this appeared to begin. what do we know about the derivation of these protests and what caused it? >> i think right now, the administration has backed off -- initial impression this might be connected with al-qaeda. there are reasons we can go into why that was a plausible conjecture. it appears to have been it was a group, unlike al-qaeda is not a transnational group. it is a libyan extremist islamist, armed group. therefore, very dangerous to libya. and from everything we can tell, they either opportunistically seized on this or caused it to happen. it's quite different from cairo in the sense it's not even clear there was a spontaneous gathering of a crowd there at all. clearly, there was a decision at some point by ansar says is a rogue group. there was a decision to use
doesn't have to be played under his rules. >> ambassador ginsberg, if we could look at the region broadly, a vexing question facing the united states right now is what's in the best interest of the u.s.? a sort of friendly cooperative dictator, though they may be brutally repressive to the people or a messy, uncertain democracy like in egypt and libya right now. >> the genie's out of the bottle in the middle east. the fact of the matter is every one of the countries going through a transition and it's going to take many acts to follow before we know what's going to happen, whether it's in egypt, syria, saudi arabia or iran. the problem is right now the united states standing in the region has deteriorated rapidly in the last couple of years under president obama. since his cairo speech. most unfortunate. i'm the last person to want to see that. i think the president had the best of intentions to try to rebuild ties with the muslim world but the high expectations of what to deliver versus the changes taking place have created a circumstance where there's great disappointment with t
is marc ginsberg, former u.s. u.s. ambassador to morocco who also served as deputy senior adviser for middle east policies to president carter. welcome. >> thank you. >> with the report of chemical weapons, this sounds treacherous. >> it does. you indicated there are hundreds of thousands of refugees streaming across syria's northern border with turkey and southern board with jordan creating an humanitarian crisis for relief, but think of the untold thousand who is are injured and wounded inside the cities who no longer have relief coming to them. >> eliot: this is a humanitarian crisis. i do not see the international community organizing itself to handle the refugee crisis in turkey jordan, or beginning to act in a way that is appropriate for what is going on in syria. am i not seeing it or is there not an efficient response. >> it's not only inadequate, but it's embarrassing inadequate. the greater the humanitarian crisis in syria the more impact it has in destabilizing our allies in turkey and elsewhere let alone those who will be die dieing. >> eliot: president morsi of egypt
that a wonderful person, ginsberg, leaves the court. she's very much beloved in that court even by -- i learned if from your books how much they get along, she and scalia, for example. maybe he leaves. can a president of the center left like obama or a president who seems to be on the right right now like romney, can they make a 180 degree switcharoo. could they take the ginsberg seat and give it to the right? would it get past a simple majority? >> the fact is most supreme court nominations get through. robert bork didn't get through in 1987. harriet miers withdrew at the end of the president bush's term. by and large supreme court appointments get through, but we have not seen a liberal replace a conservative in a very long time, maybe 1993 when byron white was replaced by ruth ginsburg, but if, for example, the conservative -- one of the conservative justices leaves in a second obama term, that will be the world war 3 of all time because the conservative movement in this country has embraced their version of the constitution as a fundamental aspect of what they believe in. more than the demo
us is mark ginsberg former ambassador to morocco. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning. >> how troubling is this to you, sir? >> oh, it's extremely troubling. i know libya well. i obviously know north africa well. the fact that a colleague in the foreign service and other members of the consulate may have been killed on a premeditated attack on a consulate is extraordinarily disturbing. it's the first u.s. ambassador that has lost his life in the line of duty since 1979. benghazi has been particularly troublesome to the central libyan government. it has always been the hotbed of islamic extremism in libya. we cannot underestimate the travails that the libyan government still has in trying to consolidate control over the country and the fact of the matter is, is that there are extremist elements operating in eastern benghazi and this clearly had to be a premeditated attack on the consulate and it's just a terrible shame because chris was one of the greatest arabist diplomats in the region, someone who dedicated many years to helping to consolidate freedom in libya. he worked in
that probably even libyans haven't shared. >> reporter: mark ginsberg is a former ambassador to morocco. >> he was one of those people who dedicated his life to reconciliation between the arab and the united states. he was a peace corps volunteer. he joined the foreign service and obviously committed his life to not only reconstruction and rehabilitation of arab societies, but also focused on libya quite a bit. >> in speaking to americans, and muslims today throughout the washington area, we heard the same message over and over. they hope that the assassination of ambassador stevens does not derail the partnership between the united states and the new libya. wendy and jim? >> christ gordon, thank you. we will be continuing to follow this story. we'll have more on the deadly attacks. the violent protest in the middle east, and there is also new reaction to this. you can also stay up to date on nbcwashington.com. >>> for the second time in three weeks, prince george's county is dealing tonight with the murder of a high school student. both crimes remain unsolved. pat collins joins us from capito
of the justices ruth bader ginsberg is 79 but she is in frail health. >> john: indeed. >> we do focus on the court for good reason around abortion rights, critical issues like that. but what this issue looks at is how this court has empowered the 1% at the expense of the 99%, that the powerful have their thumbs all over this court while the working people are getting the shaft from this court. >> john: absolutely. >> shielding financial institutions from accountability. and of course in the citizens united decision of 2010 it allowed the infusion of money into an all right polluted political system, which takes us back to our platform because so many issues we brought up, these are connected to the money in our politics. there's a reason we don't have some of these reforms or the reforms that president obama fought for. >> even though the public wants? >> exactly. >> the congress and the courts -- >> john: but it wasn't popular with joe lieberman, so we're not going to have it. >> right. >> the danger is the more and more that the scales are tipped towards the su
. >> john: thank you. ruth ginsberg is 131 years old -- >> but she doesn't look a day over 35. >> john: that's right. even if you are a republican you just show up and vote on the first wednesday of november all right? [ laughter ] >> john: let's go to paul in nevada. good morning, you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, john, frank, and it's a real pleasure to talk to you, kelly. i loved your father i thought he was acutely cognizant and was not fooled by the smoke and mirrors. >> john: and neither are the listeners to "stephanie miller show." >> he had an experience with coke and mirrors, but -- [ laughter ] >> caller: that was a good one. >> well done frank. >> caller: the quip of romney having his birther joke there were nuns in the background that were having a huge laugh on that. >> john: as a child of a former nun i was embarrassed by that. >> caller: yeah. and i originally am from washington, d.c., and i sew george carlin at the constitution hall, it was one of the best moments of my life, because i loved george carlin i always thou
published their first major books within weeks of each other. i follow that with allen ginsberg, james baldwin, christopher isherwood, tennessee williams was also working at this time too, this is like the first wave, and they caught a lot of grief for what they wrote. right after world war ii, homosexuality was illegal in all 48 states. you couldn't talk openly as a gay person. but you could write fiction about it and say i'm not writing about myself, i'm writing about these other people who are fictional. everybody saw through this white lie and understood what was going on. but they caught a little use from critics about it. the critics couldn't say, oh, you're clearly a homosexual, that would've been liable at this time. they found other ways to kind of complaint and attack and criticize. this first-generation caught a lot of great rema so how explicit are open could a james baldwin be or a christian be? >> they were initially very open. the second novel, giovanni's room, is about -- it's about two white men in paris, one of the great black american writers. before his second novel
, roof dedekind's bird. -- ruth bather ginsberg. my biggest supporter on the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch. and he confirmed that. the hearings when over three days, but there were no hardball questions. so the senators were mostly using me to speak to me to their constituents to show how caring there were, how well- informed they were. [laughter] they spent a lot more time talking benighted. [laughter] -- they spend a lot more time talking than i did. [laughter] i helped to launch the women's rights project. i had been on the council for seven years. there was not a single question, not a single question about my aclu affiliation. i think what it will take is great stakes on both sides of the aisle and this is not the fault of one party rather than the other. the over 30-votes for someone qualified in any case, it will take both sides of the aisle to come together and say it enough, this is not the way it should be. we should be approving judges. a person who is devoted to the law, to do the hard work that is involved. that is what should count. there was a great m
ginsberg when she retires for example. you want to know if there's any practical experience, and the obama at the lustration has declined to defend the defense of marriage act. present romney might decide he would defend the constitutionality of that statute. it does seem like that has a lot of salience and presidential debates. i.t. think it will not happen. here is why. no major national political figure has attacked as publicly since 1996 or before. it is remarkable. the republicans were seeing some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. they do not do it anymore. john kerry said maybe it is time to stop these racial preferences. the democratic leadership council was inching down that road. that is all gone. this is why we get so demonized if we ever raise our voices against affirmative action. part of it was there was an incredibly bitter campaign in california over proposition 29 which banned racial preferences in state programs in 1996. really bitter. i think it is fair to say there is an awful lot of demonizing going on against the supporters of propositio
place. you could see justice begins byrd, now that she is accomplished, she was -- ginsberg, now that she is accomplished, we may see her retire if obama wins. it makes a huge potential shift in the court based on the next president. you could have up to three additional nominees if something else happened and that would give a obama the opportunity to appoint the majority of the members of the supreme court, or it would give romney a chance to possibly shift the balance. anyone replacing justice kennedy will affect the balance, making it easier, assuming the president knows who to pick. >> you said retirements during this term. my prediction would be none. they all seem to be pretty healthy. >> in four years they could think it would be great to have somebody to replace me, but for years is a long time. i will worry about that later, i am having fun now. >> speaking of fun, we please join me in thanking our panel. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> at 5:00 eastern, we will go to the united nations f
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)